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DCS Reference: Air Defences, Western

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Italicised units — ones with their number in parenthesis — are optional and not necessary for the functioning of the system. Beyond that, the numbers listed only indicate the doctrinal setups and all systems only require one of each mandatory unit to work if the mission designer wants to reduce the overall unit count. Units (mainly decorative) that can be found outside the Air Defence category have their category indicated in parentheses, as do decorations that only exist as static objects. For some of the more advanced systems, it is good practice to make the command post unit the first unit in the group, but some scripting setups such as Skynet-IADS will require specific units to be the the first one in the group in order for the scripting to work.

Radar-guided

Flakpanzer Gepard

From the 1970's until 2010, this unit was the cornerstone of the air defence of the German Army.

Flakpanzer Gepard
Units Qty Function Stores Range / Symbol
SPAAA Gepard ? Self-propelled AAA 2×330× 35mm HE Detection: 0–8.1nm / 0–15km
Detection alt.: 0–9,800ft / 0–3000m
RWR-A.pngRWR-L.pngPO1-NA.png
Engagement: 0–2.2nm / 0–4km
Engagement alt.: 0–9,800ft / 0–3000m
Reload / rearm RoF: 1,100 rpm; 1800s total rearm time from a depleted state.
Acquisition time 1s scan + 3s acquisition.
Acquisition limits Radar lock-on: 6.9nm / 12.8km. Notch: <10m/s (19kts, 36km/h) vrad.
Sensor scan coverage Radar: 360° horizontal × -15°–+60° vertical.
Visual: 360° horizontal × -3°–+27° vertical.
Aiming limits Visual: 360° vertical × -4.5°–+85° vertical.
Time to ready 5s
Kill radius N/A
Notes
Has a radar for searching, ranging, and tracking targets. Note that most eastern RWRs do not display this threat.

Has no special setup and is instead integrated into armoured or mechanised columns.

Available to
Belgium, from 1977 to 2008 Brazil, from 2013 Chile, from 2008 to 2011 Combined Joint Task Force Blue, but only with historical units turned off Combined Joint Task Force Red, but only with historical units turned off Germany, from 1976 Jordan, from 2014 The Netherlands, from 1977 Romania, from 2004 United Nations Peacekeepers, but only with historical units turned off USAF Aggressors, but only with historical units turned off
Tactics
Not particularly threatening unless you are flying low. Since the 1980's, it is standard procedure to accompany these with Stinger MANPADs, who would take advantage of the Flakpanzer's radar as an early warning system.

Note that it still is largely optically guided — do not be fooled by the notch window and think that you can just hover in a helo nearby and plink away without it firing back.

M163 Vulcan Air Defence Systems (VADS)

In service from 1969 to 1993, this AAA gun is comparable to the Shilka. Despite its designation as a AAA gun, in practice it tended to be used more as a ground support weapon, as its range was simply insufficient against air threats.

M163 Vulcan Air Defence Systems (VADS)
Units Qty Function Stores Range
AAA Vulcan M163 1 Radar-ranging, self-propelled AAA 1180× 20mm Detection: 0–4nm / 0–7.5km
Detection alt.: 0–16,400ft / 0–5,000m
RWR-A.pngPO1-NA.png
Engagement: 0–1.1nm / 0–2km
Engagement alt.: 0–4,900ft / 0–1,500m
Reload / rearm RoF: 3,000 rpm; 1200s total rearm time from a depleted state.
Acquisition time 4s acquisition.
Acquisition limits Radar lock-on: 6.9nm / 12.8km. Notch: <10m/s (19kts, 36km/h) vrad.
Sensor scan coverage Visual: 360° horizontal × -15°–+70° vertical.
Aiming limits Visual: 360° horizontal × -5°–+70° vertical.
Time to ready 2s
Kill radius N/A
Notes
Optical sight with radar ranging. Note that most eastern RWRs do not display this threat.

Has no special setup and is instead intended to complement the M48 Chaparral, and be integrated into infantry/light mechanised columns.

Available to
Chile, from 1999 Combined Joint Task Force Blue, but only with historical units turned off Combined Joint Task Force Red, but only with historical units turned off Egypt, from 1997 Israel, from 1973 Jordan, from 1978 Morocco, from 1979 Oman, but only with historical units turned off Portugal, from Saudi Arabia, but only with historical units turned off South Korea, from 1973 Thailand, from 1980 United Nations Peacekeepers, but only with historical units turned off USA, from 1968 to 1994 USAF Aggressors, but only with historical units turned off Yemen, from 1979
Tactics
Designed as a complement to, and should be deployed alongside the M48 Chaparral. By itself, it is basically helpless to a competent bombing run.

Like with the Gepard, note that it still is largely optically guided. Just because it has a notch window does not mean you can sit in a 0m/s hover nearby and expect it not to shoot you.

MIM-23 Hawk PIP Phase I

First seen in the 1960's, this medium range SARH SAM system was designed to be a more mobile replacement of the MIM-14 Nike Hercules. It was superseded by the Patriot system in the 90's.

The Phase I hawk, as seen in game, is primarily deployed in the hands of both Saudi Arabia and Iran, the latter thanks to US policy misadventures in the 80's.

MIM-23 Hawk PIP Phase I
Units Qty Function Stores Range / Symbol
SAM Hawk PCP 1 Platoon Command Post Detection 0.8–86nm / 1.5–160km
Detection alt.: 49–82,000ft / 15–25,000m[1]
SAM Hawk CWAR AN/MPQ-55 1 Continuous Wave Acquisition Radar (low-altitude search) Detection: 0.8–37.8nm / 1.5–70km
Detection alt.: 49–9,800ft / 15–3,000m
RWR-HA.pngPO1-Medium.png
SAM Hawk SR AN/MPQ-50 1 Pulse Acquisition Radar (high-altitude search) Detection: 0.8–48.6nm / 1.5–90km
Detection alt.: 427–65,600ft / 150–20,000m
RWR-HA.pngPO1-Medium.png
SAM Hawk TR AN/MPQ-46 2 High Power Illumination doppler Radar (tracking) Detection: 0.8–48.5nm / 1.5–90km
Detection alt.: 82–65,600ft / 25–20,000m
RWR-HK.pngPO1-Medium.png
SAM Hawk LN M192 6 Launcher 3× MIM-23B Low alt. engagement: 0.8–11.9nm / 1.5–22km
High alt. engagement: 0.8–24.3nm / 1.5–45km
Engagement alt.: 82–59,000ft / 25–18,000m
Max speed: Mach 2.3
(Approximation: SAM Hawk PCP) (1) Assault Fire Command Console
(Approximation: SAM Hawk PCP) (1) Launcher Section Controls
(Unarmed) Transport M818 (3) M501 Loading Tractor
(Static Cargos) Container (12) M390 Missile Pallet 3× MIM-23B
(Static Structures) GeneratorF (4) Battery Control Central
(Static Structures) GeneratorF (2) Information Coordination Central
(Static Structures) GeneratorF (2) SEA 56kVA Generator
Reload / rearm 5s to ready new missile; 420s reload per missile;
420s total rearm time from a depleted state (loads in parallel).
Acquisition time PCP: 0.1s.
CWAR: 1s scan + 11s acquisition.
SR: 1s scan + 11s acquisition.
TR: 1s scan + 10s acquisition.
Acquisition limits CWAR lock-on: 32.1nm / 59.5km. Notch: <15m/s (29kts, 54km/h) vrad.
SR lock-on: 41.3nm / 76.5km. Notch: < 15m/s (29kts, 54km/h) vrad.
TR lock-on: 41.3nm / 76.5km. Notch: < 10m/s (19kts, 36km/h) vrad.
Target tracking PCP can track 1 target at a time, fed by CWAR/SR.
CWAR can track 10 targets at a time.
SR can track 10 targets at a time.
TR can guide 2 missiles at a time at a single target, designated by PCP.
Target size limit: 0.22m².[2]
Sensor scan coverage CWAR: 360° horizontal × -15°–+60° vertical.
SR: 360° horizontal × -15°–+60° vertical.
TR: 360° horizontal × -15°–+60° vertical.
Time to ready 2s
Kill radius 12m
Notes
The optional components are mostly for decoration (especially the static cargo containers and generators), although the many transport units will provide rearming functionality for the launchers.

There exists a Range Only Radar component that is a fall-back system to help with ranging in a high-ECM environment. It is not simulated or present in DCS. Similarly, the AFCC and LSC are distributed systems for redundancy should the command post be eliminated. The effect of these can be approximated by adding additional PCPs.

The system is static cannot be driven using Combined Arms.

Available to
Bahrain, from 1997 Belgium, from 1980 Combined Joint Task Force Blue, but only with historical units turned off Combined Joint Task Force Red, but only with historical units turned off Denmark, from 1979 Egypt, from 1983 France, from 1979 to 2012 Germany, from 1979 to 2005 Greece, from 1979 Iran, from 1979 Israel, from 1979 Italy, from 1979 Japan, from 1980 Jordan, from 1979 Kuwait, from 1979 Morocco, but only with historical units turned off The Netherlands, from 1979 Norway, from 1987 Saudi Arabia, from 1979 South Korea, from 1979 South Ossetia, but only with historical units turned off Spain, from 1979 Sweden, from 1983 Turkey, from 2005 United Arab Emirates, from 1986 United Nations Peacekeepers, but only with historical units turned off USA, from 1979 to 1994 USAF Aggressors, but only with historical units turned off
Tactics
The typical setup has redundant radars, requiring a few ARMs to take down. Being a SARH, defeating the tracking radar is enough to defeat the missile.

MIM-104 Patriot PAC-2

The PATRIOT, or, Phased Array Tracking Radar to Intercept on Target, for those keeping track of the DoDs contributions to the field of tortured acronyms, is the premiere American long range SAM system. Initially conceived as an anti-aircraft system, the PAC-2 variant depicted in DCS features optimizations which make it efficient at engaging cruise missiles.

MIM-104 Patriot PAC-2
Units Qty Function Stores Range / Symbol
SAM Patriot ECS AN/MSQ-104 4-6 Engagement Control Station Detection: 1.6–86nm / 3–160km
Detection alt.: 82–98,400ft / 25–30,000m[1]
SAM Patriot STR AN/MPQ-53 4-6 PESA Radar (search and track) Detection 1.6–86nm / 3–160km
Detection alt.: 197–98,400ft / 60–30,000m
RWR-PT.pngPO1-Long.png
SAM Patriot LN M901 24-36 Launcher 4× MIM-104C Low alt. engagement: 1.6–16.2nm / 3–30km
High alt. engagement: 1.6–64.8nm / 3–120km
Engagement alt.: 82–79,500ft / 25–24,240m
Max speed: Mach 5.0
SAM Patriot AMG AN/MRC-137 (4-6 ) Antenna Mast Group
SAM Patriot ICC (1) Information Coordination Central
SAM Patriot EPP-III (4-6) Diesel-Electric Power Plant
(Unarmed) HEMTT TFFT (4-6) Guided Missile Transporter
(Unarmed) HEMTT TFFT (4-6) Large Repair Parts Transporter HEMTT
(Unarmed) Transport M818 (1) Maintenance Center
(Unarmed) Transport M818 (8-12) Small Repair Parts Transporter
(Static Cargos) Container (8-12) Parts containers
Reload / rearm 3s to ready new missile; 900s reload per missile;
3600s total rearm time from a depleted state.
Acquisition time ECS: 0.1s.
STR: 1s scan + 15s acquisition.
Acquisition limits[3] STR lock-on: 119.3nm / 221km. Notch: <15m/s (29kts, 54km/h) vrad.
Target tracking ECS can track 8 targets at a time, fed by the STR.
STR can guide 2 missiles per target at a time; can track 8 targets, designated by the ECS.
Target size limit: 0.049m².[2]
Sensor scan coverage STR: 360° horizontal × -15°–+60° vertical.
Time to ready 2s
Kill radius 13m
Notes
Has self-defence anti-missile capability.

The system is static and cannot be driven using Combined Arms.

Available to
Combined Joint Task Force Blue, but only with historical units turned off Combined Joint Task Force Red, but only with historical units turned off Germany, from 1990 Greece, from 1999 Israel, from 1991 Japan, from 1990 Kuwait, from 1995 The Netherlands, from 1990 Oman, but only with historical units turned off Saudi Arabia, from 1993 South Korea, from 2008 Spain, from 2005 United Arab Emirates, but only with historical units turned off United Nations Peacekeepers, but only with historical units turned off USA, from 1990 USAF Aggressors, but only with historical units turned off
Tactics
The Patriot system is designed around a battalion echelon, made of up 4-6 platoons. The ICC and the Maintenance Centre are part of the command platoon, which oversees 4-6 "line battery" platoons, each containing one of each radar type, six launchers, and other support units distributed among them. It is a strategically important and expensive system, and as such typically supported by MANPADs.

The system is capable of shooting down missiles and aircraft alike with its fully active radar missiles. Considering the number of redundant sensors used within a properly configured battalion, this system would require a sustained barrage of ordinance to bring down. At the same time, note that these larger numbers are quite necessary since each individual component is actually a fair bit less capable than their SA-10 counterparts.

Rapier

Entering service in the British Army in 1971 as a replacement for its dated AAA guns, this system would replace most of its other air defence options by 1977. This unique system uses manually guided camera equipped missiles to guide to target.

Rapier
Units Qty Function Stores Range / Symbol
Rapier FSA Launcher 1 Launcher, Surveillance Radar, IFF, and generator. 4× Rapier Mk1 Detection 0.3–16.2nm / 0.5–30km
Detection alt.: 164–13,100ft / 50–4,000m
RWR-RS.pngPO1-Short.png
Engagement: 0.2–3.7nm / 0.4–6.8km
Engagement alt.: 164–9,800ft / 50–3,000m[4]
Max speed: Mach 2.5
Rapier FSA Blindfire Tracker 1 Blindfire “Field Standard A” Tracking Radar Detection 0.3–16.2nm / 0.5–30km
Altitude: 164–13,100ft / 50–4,000m
RWR-RT.pngPO1-Short.png
Engagement: 0.2–16.2nm / 0.4–30km
Engagement alt.: 65–26,200ft / 20–8,000m[5]
Rapier FSA Optical Tracker (1) SACLOS Optical Tracking unit Detection: 0.2–10.8nm / 0.4–20km
Altitude: 65–26,200ft / 20–8,000m
(Unarmed) Land Rover 101 FC (1) Forward Controller
(Unarmed) Transport M818 (1) Missile Supply Trailer
Reload / rearm 3s to ready new missile; 37.5s reload per missiles;
180s total ream time from a depleted state.
Acquisition time SR: 1s scan + 2s acquisition
TR: 1s scan + 0.1s acquisition.
OT: 6s acquisition.
Acquisition limits SR lock-on: 11.5nm / 21.3km. Notch: <10m/s (19kts, 36km/h) vrad.
TR lock-on: 5.5nm / 10.2km. Notch: <10m/s (19kts, 36km/h) vrad.
Target tracking SR can track a single target.
TR can guide a single missile at a single target, fed by the SR.
OT can track a single target, but plays no role in engaging targets.
Target size limit: 0.1m².[2]
Scan zone SR: 360° horizontal × -15°–+60° vertical.
TR: 360° horizontal × -15°–+60° vertical.
OT: 360° horizontal × -3°–+70° vertical.
Time to ready 2s
Kill radius 0m (only direct hits)
Notes
The FC and the regular land-rover are country-appropriate decorations but provie no functionality, not even ammunition loading.

The system should be capable of running pure SACLOS without the Blindfire radar, but its capabilities of detection and successful acquisition are greatly diminished by doing so and the internal setup is almost the exact opposite: the system works very will with just the radar, and the optical tracker can be left out without any ill effects. With only the OT present, the launcher will follow detected targets, but will be very hesitant to fire on them unless they fly at low speed, low altitude, and short range. In practice, optically guided missiles will only ever really be a threat to helicopters.

The missile guidance essentially uses Vikhr logic, which causes it to oscillate up and down on launch before it finds a stable flight path. Without good elevation and/or ground clearance, the downward oscillation can easily make the missile hit the ground. This means that even against helicopters, attempted launches will commonly fail to get a missile to successful guide towards the target.

The system is static and cannot be driven using Combined Arms.

Available to
Australia, but only with historical units turned off Combined Joint Task Force Blue, but only with historical units turned off Combined Joint Task Force Red, but only with historical units turned off Iran, but only with historical units turned off Iraq, but only with historical units turned off Libya, but only with historical units turned off Malaysia, but only with historical units turned off The Netherlands, but only with historical units turned off Oman, but only with historical units turned off Switzerland, but only with historical units turned off Turkey, but only with historical units turned off United Arab Emirates, but only with historical units turned off United Kingdom, but only with historical units turned off United Nations Peacekeepers, but only with historical units turned off USAF Aggressors, but only with historical units turned off
Tactics
The system is capable of firing without the radar in real life, but this capability is not well reflected in DCS at this time. Being optically guided, low flyers should need to be wary that RWRs will not alert them to fired missiles, and that neither flares nor chaff would do much to help you evade. The only indication being the tracking radar, especially at night. However, since it is wholly reliant on that tracking radar in DCS, and since it has a very unstable high-low-yoyo launch profile, you get ample warning of the system long before it can fire, and it cannot launch against low-flying enemies without the missile striking the ground before it achieves stable flight.

Mission-makers wanting to make use of this system need to take care to either place the launchers in downward slopes, or somehow ensure that approaching targets stay some 1000ft / 300m above the ground in order for any appreciable threat to exist.

Roland 2

Developed jointly by the French and Germans in the 70's, this short range SAM was designed to protect mobile field formations and fixed, high-value targets such as airfields.

Roland 2
Units Qty Function Stores Range / Symbol
SAM Roland ADS ? Marder-mounted Air Defence System 5× 2× Roland Detection: 0.81–6.5nm / 1.5–12km
Detection alt.: 65–19,600ft / 20–6,000m
RWR-RO.pngPO1-Short.png
Engagement: 0.3–4.3nm / 0.5–8km
Engagement alt.: 32–19,600ft / 10–6,000m
Max speed: Mach 2.0
SAM Roland EWR (1) TÜR Early-Warning Radar Detection: 0.81–18.9nm / 1.5–35km
Altitude: 49–19,600ft / 15–6,000m
RWR-GR.pngPO1-Short.png
Reload / rearm 3s to ready new missile; 6s reload per missile;
300s total ream time from a depleted state.
Acquisition time ADS: 1s scan + 8s acquisition
EWR: 1s scan + 12s acquisition.
Acquisition limits ADS lock-on: 5.5nm / 10.2km. Notch: <10m/s (19kts, 36km/h) vrad.
EWR lock-on: 16.1nm / 29.8km. Notch: <15m/s (29kts, 54km/h) vrad.
Target tracking ADS can track and guide a single missile to a single target.
EWR can track 10 targets.
EWR target size limit: 0.18m² (no limit stated for ADS).[2]
Scan zone ADS: 360° horizontal × -15°–+60° vertical.
EWR: 360° horizontal × -15°–+60° vertical.
Aiming limits ADS: 360° horizontal × 0–60° vertical.
Time to ready ADS: 2s
EWR: 5s
Kill radius 5m
Notes
Has a radar for searching, ranging, and tracking targets as well as for missile guidance. No information exists whether the EWR actually helps the ADS with target detection and selection.

In Combined Arms, reloading and rearming the ADS can be prone to breakdowns unless babied through the process, and missiles can have a hard time tracking at lower altitudes. The EWR cannot be driven.

Available to
Argentina, from 1982 Brazil, from 1978 Combined Joint Task Force Blue, but only with historical units turned off Combined Joint Task Force Red, but only with historical units turned off France, from 1977 Germany, from 1977 Iraq, from 1982 Qatar, from 1987 Spain, from 1988 United Nations Peacekeepers, but only with historical units turned off USA, from 1980 USAF Aggressors, but only with historical units turned off Venezuela, from 1985
Tactics
While nominally capable of optical target acquisition and tracking, it is in all practical terms a radar guided missile in DCS. This mobile system is typically integrated into armoured or mechanised columns.

IR-guided

Infrared missiles do not alert pilots on the RWR (though Missile Approach Warning System aircraft like the A-10 and JF-17 may still be warned of an inbound missile). While modern militaries are more than happy to proliferate and sling cheap shots with these, it is recognized that they are a big "Fuck You" to inattentive pilots, and can render a mission unfun if not used judiciously. Many goon missions limit the use IR missiles to catch out pilots who strayed from the briefed course, or as an occasional threat to catch unaware pilots.

Note that IR lock-on distances can wildly exceed or fail to meet the nominal detection ranges of their respective systems since they operate on the basis of an IR signature size that may shrink or bloom depending on aspect, throttle position, and similar factors. For AI units, this rarely makes any difference since they are bound by the sensor detection mechanics, but a player-controlled unit can conceivably be very lucky and lock up a target much sooner than expected (but it is unlikely that the missile itself will actually fly that far).

AN/TWQ-1 / M1097 Heavy HMMWV Avenger

Essentially a Humvee mounted platform to launch Stinger missiles from, this unit started replacing the M163 and M167 VADS in the '90:s.

AN/TWQ-1 / M1097 Heavy HMMWV Avenger
Units Qty Function Stores Range
SAM Avenger M1097 ? IR-guided, self-propelled SAM 2× 8× FIM-92
200× 12.7mm
Detection: 0–2.8nm / 0–5.2km
Detection alt.: 0–16,400ft / 0–5,000m
Low alt. engagement: 0.1–2.7nm / 0.2–5km
High alt. engagement: 0.1–3.2nm / 0.2–6km
Engagement alt.: 32–11,500ft / 10–3,500m
Max speed: Mach 2.2
Reload / rearm 1s to ready new missile; 40s reload per missile;
400s total missile ream time from a depleted state.
RoF: 1100 rpm; 25s gun rearm time from a depleted state.
Acquisition time 2s acquisition.
Acquisition limits IR lock-on: 5.4nm / 10km for a normalised heat source.
Sensor scan coverage IR: 360° horizontal × -3°–+70° vertical.
Aiming limits Visual: 360° horizontal × -10°–+70° vertical.
Time to ready 2s
Kill radius 0m Countermeasure resistance factor ×2
Notes
Optical acquisition all-aspect IR homing.
Available to
Bharain, from 2003 Chile, from 2014 Combined Joint Task Force Blue, but only with historical units turned off Combined Joint Task Force Red, but only with historical units turned off Egypt, from 2000 Iraq, from 2013 Israel, but only with historical units turned off Oman, from 2016 Turkey, but only with historical units turned off United Arab Emirates, but only with historical units turned off United Nations Peacekeepers, but only with historical units turned off USA, from 1989 USAF Aggressors, but only with historical units turned off
Tactics
Typically embedded among mobile infantry or HMMWV / Stryker-based columns, this system and its all-aspect IR missiles are extremely mobile and dangerous threat to low-flying air targets.

FIM-92 Stinger

Replacing the Redeye MANPAD in 1982, the stinger missile is a cheap and easy point defence option for a variety of situations.

FIM-92 Stinger
Units Qty Function Stores Range
Stinger MANPADS 1 IR-guided Man-Portable Air Defense System 3× FIM-92 Detection: 0–2.8nm / 0–5.2km
Detection alt.: 0–16,400ft / 0–5,000m
Engagement: 0.1–2.4nm / 0.2–4.5km
Engagement alt.: 32–11,500ft / 10–3,500m
Max speed: Mach 2.2
SAM Stinger comm (1) Command unit Detecton: 0–2.4nm / 0–4.5km
Detection alt.: 32–11,500ft / 10–3,500m
Reload / rearm 1s to ready new missile; 40s reload per missile;
120s total ream time from a depleted state.
Acquisition time Stinger: 2s acquisition.
Commander: 5s acquisition.
Acquisition limits IR lock-on: 5.4nm / 10km for a normalised heat source.
Sensor scan coverage IR: 360° horizontal × -3°–+70° vertical.
Aiming limits Visual: 360° horizontal × -45°–+80° vertical.
Time to ready 2s
Kill radius 0m Countermeasure resistance factor ×2
Notes
Optical acquisition all-aspect IR homing.

The commander is a static unit and cannot be driven using Combined Arms. The commander offers no clear numbers or mechanical advantage except maybe offering a second sensor scan coverage that can detect enemies in a direction the launcher unit is not currently looking.

Available to
Angola, from 1986 Bahrain, from 1987 Belgium, but only with historical units turned off Brazil, but only with historical units turned off Canada, but only with historical units turned off Chile, but only with historical units turned off Combined Joint Task Force Blue, but only with historical units turned off Combined Joint Task Force Red, but only with historical units turned off Denmark, from 1994 Egypt, from 1991 Finland, from 2014 France, from 1983 Georgia, but only with historical units turned off Germany, from 1993 Greece, from 1989 Insurgents, but only with historical units turned off Iraq, from 2013 Israel, from 1993 Italy, from 1986 Japan, from 1984 The Netherlands, from 1985 Norway, but only with historical units turned off Oman, from 2016 Pakistan, from 1985 Portugal, but only with historical units turned off Qatar, from 1988 Saudi Arabia, from 1984 South Korea, from 1987 Spain, but only with historical units turned off Switzerland, from 1993 Turkey, from 1993 UK, from 1982 United Nations Peacekeepers, but only with historical units turned off USA, from 1978 USAF Aggressors, but only with historical units turned off
Tactics
Able to be hidden anywhere one can reasonably find two guys and a tube, this can deliver an all-aspect infrared homing package of "Fuck You" to flow flying aircraft. Stinger teams can be found in almost any detachment, including infantry columns, supplementing point defence on fixed installations, even on the decks of warships.

This is a very difficult target to spot, but its threat can be circumvented by generally flying high. Safety flares and speed during low attack runs can help mitigate the threat from this, but it's no guarantee.

M6 Linebacker

A version of everybody's troop transport that can't carry troops, reconnaissance vehicle that's too conspicuous to do reconnaissance, quasi-tank that has less armour than a snowblower but has enough ammo to take out half of DC: the Bradley. This version was built… with Stingers!

M6 Linebacker
Units 1 Function Stores Range
SAM Linebacker M6 1 IR-guided, self-propelled SAM and IFV 3× 4× FIM-92
230× 25mm HE
70× 25mm AP
800× 7.62mm
Detection: 0–4.3nm / 0–8km
Detection alt.: 0–16,400ft / 0–5,000m
Engagement: 0.1–2.4nm / 0.2–4.5km
Engagement alt.: 32–11,500ft / 10–3,500m
Max speed: Mach 2.2
Reload / rearm 1s to ready new missile; 20s reload per missile;
240s total missile ream time from a depleted state.
7.25mm RoF: 850 rpm; 480s gun rearm time from a depleted state.
25mm RoF: 100/200 rpm; 800s (HE) + 400s (AP) cannon rearm time from a depleted state.
Acquisition time 2s acquisition.
Acquisition limits IR lock-on: 5.4nm / 10km for a normalised heat source.
Sensor scan coverage IR: 360° horizontal × -3°–+70° vertical.
Aiming limits Visual: 360° horizontal × -5°–+59° vertical.
Time to ready 5s
Kill radius 0m Countermeasure resistance factor ×2
Notes
Optical acquisition all-aspect IR homing.

When driven in Combined Arms, the guns can be locked onto targets, but the lock/loss logic is still tied to the limits of the Stingers, which means that moving the gun reticle off the target to aim at the calculated intercept point breaks the lock and makes the lead indicator go away.

Available to
Combined Joint Task Force Blue, but only with historical units turned off Combined Joint Task Force Red, but only with historical units turned off United Nations Peacekeepers, but only with historical units turned off USA, from 1997 USAF Aggressors, but only with historical units turned off
Tactics
Being yet another vehicle with Stingers strapped to it, one can expect the exact threat profile of a stinger missile, other than a slightly longer detection range, which mainly means it has more time to ready its position and aim as the target enters the engagement range.

Opposition should continue assuming that every infantry column has a stinger in some manner in it somehow, and fly high.

MIM-72G / M48 Chaparral

In service from 1969-1998, this vehicle was designed as a ground launch platform for modified AIM-9Ds. It was designed as a complement to the M163 VADS.

MIM-72G / M48 Chaparral
Units Qty Function Stores Range
SAM Chaparral M48 1 IR-guided, self-propelled SAM 2× 4× MIM-72G Detection: 0.3–5.4nm / 0.5–10km
Detection alt.: 0–16,400ft / 0–5,000m
Engagement: 0.2–4.6nmm / 0.3–8.5km
Engagement alt.: 16–9,800ft / 5–3,000m
Max speed: Mach 2.5
Reload / rearm 1s to ready new missile; 40s reload per missile;
320s total ream time from a depleted state.
Acquisition time 2s acquisition.
Acquisition limits IR lock-on: 8.1nm / 15km for a normalised heat source.
Sensor scan coverage IR: 360° horizontal × -15°–+60° vertical.
Aiming limits Visual: 360° horizontal × -9°–+89° vertical (24°–89° over the cabin).
Time to ready 5s
Kill radius 5m
Notes
Optical acquisition all-aspect IR homing.
Available to
Chile, from 1980 Combined Joint Task Force Blue, but only with historical units turned off Combined Joint Task Force Red, but only with historical units turned off Egypt, from 1988 Israel, from 1973 Morocco, from 1976 Portugal, from 1977 United Nations Peacekeepers, but only with historical units turned off Tunisia, from 2002 USA, from 1969 USAF Aggressors, but only with historical units turned off
Tactics
While the original Chaparral was rear-aspect, the version depicted in DCS represents a later version that uses FIM-92 Stinger all-aspect seekers. This was designed to operate with, and should be paired with, an M163 VADS in a mechanized infantry column.

Being a very similar platform to the stinger, similar tactics apply.

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 This unit has its own detection statistics for the purpose of determining search and Target tracking, but depends on the availability of a linked search radar to actually allow target detection.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Compare, effective target sizes:
    • Small: Vikhr: 0.012m² · AGM-114: 0.015m² · AGM-122: 0.03m² · BGM-71 / LD-10: 0.033m²
    • Medium: AGM-88 / C-701 0.05m² · Kh-23 / Kh-25 / Kh-66: 0.06m² · AGM-154 0.05–0.062m³ · AGM-65 / Rb-75: 0.063m² · LS-6: 0.07m² · C-802 / AGM-45: 0.09m²
    • Large: GB-6 / Kh-35: 0.1m² · Kh-58 / Rb-04 / Rb-05 / Rb-15 / Sea Eagle: 0.12m² · AGM-84: 0.08–0.17m² · AGM-86 / Kh-65: 0.17m² · Kh-29: 0.18m² · Kh-59: 0.2m² · Kh-31: 0.3m² · BK-90: 0.4m²
    • OMFG: ADM-141: 0.9–1.2m² · Kh-22: 1.82m² ·
  3. According to the measuring distance and lock-on distance coefficient in the data files, this system can actually detect and lock targets beyond its stated in-effect detection range. This is possibly intended to simulate data linking capabilities where “legitimate” locks can be maintained beyond the individual unit's own range. Actual engagement still requires the target to be within detection range of at least one emitter.
  4. Due to the guidance logic, when fired against targets flying below 300′ / 100m AGL, the missile will most likely hit the ground.
  5. The tracking radar has engagment limits that wildly exceed the flight capabilities of the missile, and the tracking radar's own lock-on limits, leading to erratic behaviour and occasional less-than logical attempts at engaging targets.